Nailo Recycled Glass Bead Bracelet - Turquoise Pattern

RecycledFair TradeHandmade
 
£5.00
88925
In stock
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This turquoise pattern stretch bracelet is made from recycled glass beads that are hand painted and threaded onto clear elastic. The beads are produced from crushed bottles and jars using techniques passed down through generations, and are often worn by women in the hill and mountain regions of Nepal.

Hand made by artisans in a rural area south of Nepal on the border with India. The production is coordinated by a small Nepalese workshop affiliated with the Nepal Leprosy Trust, which employs marginalised people, giving them opportunities through work.

Internal diameter measures approximately 5.5cm - stretches to fit most wrists. Beads measure approximately 0.5cm diameter.
FAIR TRADE

AURA QUE work closely with small producer groups in Nepal that are WFTO members to ensure healthy and safe work environments and payment of living wages. They also encourage trade for small Nepalese family businesses and charity handicraft units, aiming to slowly build long term relationships with these suppliers, under the same fair principles.

The production of this bracelet is coordinated by a small Nepalese workshop affiliated with the Nepal Leprosy Trust, who employ marginalised people, giving them opportunities through work. Leprosy is a disease that is still prevalent in developing countries like Nepal, and the Trust work tirelessly to educate, diagnose and treat patients in Kathmandu and Lalguardh in South Nepal.


RECYCLED

Made from recycled glass beads produced from crushed bottles and jars.
AURA QUE was founded in 2008 by Laura Queening, from which the name AURA QUE was taken. Laura lived in Nepal for several years, working directly with producers developing new product ideas as well as organising production runs. She worked with a workshop in Bhaktapur that employed local women who worked flexible hours near their homes enabling them to earn an income around their family commitments.

Laura has been working with the same fair trade producers for over 10 years, but now that she is living in Hastings, she visits Kathmandu for a few months every year to source new materials, sample new designs, maintain quality control and catch up with old friends!